Trip report – the Balkans

I spent three weeks travelling in the Balkans region of Europe this summer. The trip took in eight countries – Romania, Serbia, Bosnia, Croatia, Montenegro, Albania, Kosovo and Greece. It was a whistle-stop tour of the region, and as such my conclusions on Romania and Greece (from this trip), if not the other countries, are tentative. In fact, the main countries that I felt I actually got somewhere near to grips with were Serbia, Bosnia and Albania. Of course Romania and Greece aren’t technically in the Balkans, while Slovenia and Macedonia are, but unfortunately I didn’t have time to visit those. Next time! To see my itinerary, visit this page.

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Travel Itinerary – Three weeks in the Balkans

This is my itinerary for three weeks journeying through the Balkans, more specifically visiting the eight countries of: Romania, Serbia, Bosnia, Croatia, Montenegro, Albania, Kosovo and Greece. OK, so two of those countries aren’t technically in the Balkans, and could have been replaced with Slovenia and Macedonia. However, flying into Romania made logistical sense while Greece was a nice beach destination to end the trip with.

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AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Review (vs AF Tokina 11-20mm f/2.8 PRO DX)

Background

I bought my first wide angle lens about six months ago – the Tokina 11-20mm f/2.8 – and took it with me on a trip to Jordan. You can see the results here – all images were either taken with the Tokina or the superb Nikon AF-P 18-55. Just as this trip was ending, the Nikon 10-20 was announced. I was immediately interested – not only was this lens cheaper, it was also lighter which, as a travel photographer, appealed. Today the lens arrived and I’ve had a chance to test it out versus the Tokina in a variety of conditions.

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Trip Report – Georgia and Armenia

Background

About four years ago I absentmindedly spent time planning a dream overland trip from the UK to Australia. A key part of this route was travelling overland through Turkey to the Caucasus – Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan – before catching a ferry across the Caspian Sea to Turkmenistan, and on – through the Stans – to Asia and beyond. Even at that time Georgia and its capital Tbilisi conjured up to me some strange, mystical land, wedged between the boundaries of West and East – Istanbul, the Ural Mountains – a strange outpost of European culture in geographical Asia. Perhaps this was a very reductive way of considering the region. I didn’t know much, if anything, about the country, yet I felt it would be an interesting place to visit. Fast-forward several years and my trip to Georgia finally happened – not part of a grand overland voyage to Oz – but as a two-week solo journey that also took in neighbouring Armenia.

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